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Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2018 was released on January 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available on February 12th 2018.

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Wiring material

Main Article
A new electrical insulating fluid and its possible deployment in practice

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2017 was released on December 11th 2017. Its digital version will be available on january 11th 2018.

Lighting installations
The lighting of university building Centrale Supélec in Saclay in France
The light for our future

Daylight
Application and judgment light guides Solatube®

New materials for more safe and economical nuclear reactors

12.12.2016 | University of Wisconsin-Madison | www.engr.wisc.edu

An international team of researchers has created a nanoceramic material that not only can withstand the harsh effects of radiation, but also becomes tougher under radiation.

Traditionally, water has been used as the primary coolant in reactors, absorbing the heat released from fission reactions. Though water poses fewer risks of corrosion damage to materials, there are also limits to the temperatures up to which water-cooled reactors can operate – and in advanced reactors, increasing their temperature is the best way to increase energy production.

Nanoceramic material

Researchers from University of Wisconsin-Madison and collaborators at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) in Milan, Italy, characterized an aluminium oxide nanoceramic coating – a new material that can withstand the harmful effects of high-temperature liquid metals in advanced reactors.

Many materials tend to harden and crack when exposed to radiation. However, aluminium oxide nanoceramic coatings toughen, ultimately benefitting from irradiation.

“The pinpoint of our work is the demonstration that an amorphous or nanoceramic material can improve during irradiation, and this opens the path toward a different view of nuclear materials, specifically where coatings are concerned,” says Fabio Di Fonzo, a team leader at the IIT Center for Nano Science and Technology.

Read more at University of Wisconsin-Madison

Image Credit: University of Wisconsin-Madison

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