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Current issue

ELEKTRO 5/2018 was released on May 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available on June 6th 2018.

Topic: Lightning and overvoltage protection; EFS, EPS; ELO SYS 2018

Main Article
Energy router and its role in smart grids
Smart Cities (part 2 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2018 was released on March 16th 2018. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Fairs and exhibitions
Interior elite again after year in Letňany

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
Emergency lighting
The future of industrial lighting has name INNOVA
GOLY luminaire – the practical high bay luminaire
McLED® – brand name of first rate quality LED lighting
VOLGA EU luminaire our choice for Europe

New lead-free perovskite material for solar cells

14.02.2018 | Brown University | news.brown.edu

A class of materials called perovskites has emerged as a promising alternative to silicon for making inexpensive and efficient solar cells. But for all their promise, perovskites are not without their downsides. Most contain lead, which is highly toxic, and include organic materials that are not particularly stable when exposed to the environment.

Now a group of researchers at Brown University and University of Nebraska – Lincoln (UNL) has come up with a new titanium-based material for making lead-free, inorganic perovskite solar cells. In a paper published in the journal Joule (a new energy-focused sister journal to Cell), the researchers show that the material can be a good candidate, especially for making tandem solar cells — arrangements in which a perovskite cells are placed on top of silicon or another established material to boost the overall efficiency.

New perovskite material

The research showed the material has several advantages over other lead-free perovskite alternatives. One contender for a lead-free perovskite is a material made largely from tin, which rusts easily when exposed to the environment. Titanium, on the hand, is rust-resistant. The titanium-perovskite also has an open-circuit voltage — a measure of the total voltage available from a solar cell — of over one volt. Other lead-free perovskites generally produce voltage smaller than 0.6 volts.

Read more at Brown University

Image Credit: Brown University

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