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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2019 was released on November 6th 2019. Its digital version will be available on December 2nd 2019.

Topic: Electrical switchboards and switchboards technologies; substations

Main Article
The cause of mechanic vibration of synchronous mining engines by Palašer and its removal

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2019 was released on September 16th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Professional organizations activities
International conference LIGHT (SVĚTLO) 2019 – 6th announcement
We participated in International commission on illumination CIE 2019 congress in Washington
Technical colloquium SLOVALUX 2019

Fairs and exhibitions
Inspire with boho styl and design of Far East at autumn fair FOR INTERIOR

New competing state of matter in superconducting material

04.01.2019 | Ames Laboratory | www.ameslab.gov

A team of experimentalists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory and theoreticians at University of Alabama Birmingham discovered a remarkably long-lived new state of matter in an iron pnictide superconductor, which reveals a laser-induced formation of collective behaviors that compete with superconductivity.

Superconductivity is a strange state of matter, in which the pairing of electrons makes them move faster,” said Jigang Wang, Ames Laboratory physicist and Iowa State University professor. “One of the big problems we are trying to solve is how different states in a material compete for those electrons, and how to balance competition and cooperation to increase temperature at which a superconducting state emerges.”

New state of matter

To get a closer look, Wang and his team used laser pulses of less than a trillionth of a second in much the same way as flash photography, in order to take a series of snapshots. Called terahertz spectroscopy, this technique can be thought of as “laser strobe photography” where many quick images reveal the subtle movement of electron pairings inside the materials using long wavelength far-infrared light.

Read more at Ames Laboratory

Image Credit: Ames Laboratory

-jk-