We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 4-5/2020 was released on May 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electroinstallation; Lightning and overvoltage protection

Energetics
SüdOstLink
Energy law novel: An end to energy scammers

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

New class of materials inspired by kirigami

27. 2. 2017 | Harvard SEAS | seas.harvard.edu

Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive. Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from another ancient Japanese paper craft — kirigami.

Kirigami relies on cuts, rather than folds, to change the structure and function of materials. In a new paper published in Physical Review Letters, SEAS researchers demonstrate how a thin, perforated sheet can be transformed into a foldable 3D structure by simply stretching the cut material.

New kirigami inspired material

The team found that if the material is stretched more, the temporary deformations become permanent folds. The team also found that the pop-up pattern and resulting mechanical properties of the material can be controlled by varying the orientation of the cuts.

Read more at Harvard SEAS

Image Credit: Ahmad Rafsanjani/Harvard SEAS

-jk-