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Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2017 was released on January 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on February 17th 2017.

 

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Equipment and accessories; Marking

 

Main Article

Data analysis of photovoltaic system during an eclipse

Risk of wiring of biometric identification systems

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2016 was released on December 5th 2016. Its digital version will be available on January 5th 2017.

Interiors lighting
Colloquium Interiors 2016 – the fifth anniversary
Cooperation of indoor interior and lighting 

Standards, regulations and recommendations
New standards for road lighting

Nanowires as sensors in new type of atomic force microscope

17.10.2016 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) uses nanowires as tiny sensors. Unlike standard AFM, the device with a nanowire sensor enables measurements of both the size and direction of forces.

Nanowires are extremely tiny filamentary crystals which are built-up molecule by molecule from various materials and which are now being very actively studied by scientists all around the world because of their exceptional properties. The wires normally have a diameter of 100 nanometers and therefore possess only about one thousandth of a hair thickness.

New type of atomic force microscope

The team from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute (SNI) and the Department of Physics at the University of Basel has now demonstrated that nanowires can also be used as force sensors in atomic force microscopes. Based on their special mechanical properties, nanowires vibrate along two perpendicular axes at nearly the same frequency. When they are integrated into an AFM, the researchers can measure changes in the perpendicular vibrations caused by different forces. Essentially, they use the nanowires like tiny mechanical compasses that point out both the direction and size of the surrounding forces.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: University of Basel, Department of Physics

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