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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2019 was released on July 29th 2019. Its digital version will be available on August 29th 2019.

Lighting installations
Foxtrot controls new location of barmans
Dynamic illumination of Guardian Angels’ chapel in Sušice

Accessories of lighting installations
Safety, austerity and comfort with KNX
Worldwide first LED switching source with KNX interface from MEAN WELL producer
KNX – the system with future
Schmachtl – connector installation gesis

Mapping the brain at high resolution

18.01.2019 | MIT | www.mit.edu

Researchers have developed a new way to image the brain with unprecedented resolution and speed. Using this approach, they can locate individual neurons, trace connections between them, and visualize organelles inside neurons, over large volumes of brain tissue.

The new technology combines a method for expanding brain tissue, making it possible to image at higher resolution, with a rapid 3-D microscopy technique known as lattice light-sheet microscopy. In a paper appearing in Science Jan. 17, the researchers showed that they could use these techniques to image the entire fruit fly brain, as well as large sections of the mouse brain, much faster than has previously been possible.

Mapping technique

This technique allows researchers to map large-scale circuits within the brain while also offering unique insight into individual neurons’ functions. Imaging expanded tissue samples generates huge amounts of data — up to tens of terabytes per sample — so the researchers also had to devise highly parallelized computational image-processing techniques that could break down the data into smaller chunks, analyze it, and stitch it back together into a coherent whole.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: MIT

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