We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2016 was released on September 27th 2016. Its digital version will be available on October 27th 2016.


Topic: 22nd International trade fair ELO SYS 2016; Electrical Power Engineering; RES; Emergency Power Units


Main Article

Power system management under utilization of Smart Grid system

Printed edition of SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2016 was released on September 19th 2016. Its digital version will be available immediately.


Standards, regulations and recommendations

Regulation No 10/2016 (Prague building code) from the view of building lighting technology


Lighting installations

PROLICHT CZECH – supplier of lighting for new SAP offices

Hold up the light to see in work your work

Modern and saving LED lifting of swimming pool hall

Making Invisible Physics Visible

04.05.2016 | UCSB | www.news.ucsb.edu

New sensor technology created at UCSB captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity.

If using a single atom to capture high-resolution images of nanoscale material sounds like science fiction, think again. That’s exactly what the Quantum Sensing and Imaging Group at UC Santa Barbara has achieved. Members of physicist Ania Jayich’s lab worked for two years to develop a radically new sensor technology capable of nanometer-scale spatial resolution and exquisite sensitivity. Their findings appear in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

New sensor technology

The team chose to image a relatively well-studied superconducting material containing magnetic structures called vortices — localized regions of magnetic flux. With their instrument, the researchers were able to image individual vortices.

The team is currently imaging skyrmions — quasiparticles with magnetic vortex-like configurations — with immense appeal for future data storage and spintronic technologies. Leveraging their instrument’s nanoscale spatial resolution, they aim to determine the relative strengths of competing interactions in the material that give rise to skyrmions. “There are a lot of different interactions between atoms and you need to understand all of them before you can predict how the material will behave,” Jayich said.

Read more at UCSB

Image Credit: UCSB