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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2018 was released on December 12th 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 1st 2019.

Topic: Measurement engineering and measuring instruments; Testing industry and diagnostics

Main Article
Thermovision measurement in electrical power engineering
Smart Cities (part 5)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2018 was released on December 3rd 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2019.

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modular floodlights Siteco
Decorative luminaire PRESBETON H-E-X from the integral series town equipment
LED luminaires ESALITE – revolution in sphere of industrial lighting

Daylight
About median illumination by daylight
Professional colloquium Daylight in practice

Looking for the next leap in rechargeable batteries

20.02.2017 | University of Southern California | news.usc.edu

USC researchers may have just found a solution for one of the biggest stumbling blocks to the next wave of rechargeable batteries.

The lithium-sulfur battery, long thought to be better at energy storage capacity than its more popular lithium-ion counterpart, was hampered by its short cycle life. Currently the lithium-sulfur battery can be recharged 50 to 100 times — impractical as an alternative energy source compared to 1,000 times for many rechargeable batteries on the market today.

Lithium-sulfur battery

The solution devised by researchers from USC is something they call the “Mixed Conduction Membrane,” or MCM, a small piece of non-porous, fabricated material sandwiched between two layers of porous separators, soaked in electrolytes and placed between the two electrodes.

The membrane works as a barrier in reducing the shuttling of dissolved polysulfides between anode and cathode, a process that increases the kind of cycle strain that has made the use of lithium-sulfur batteries for energy storage a challenge. This novel membrane solution preserves the high-discharge rate capability and energy density without losing capacity over time.

Read more at University of Southern California

Image Credit: Sri Narayan

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