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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2017 was released on October 10th 2017. Its digital version will be available on October 10th 2017.

Topic: Electrical power engineering; RES; Fuel cells; Batteries and accumulators

Main Article
Electricity storage
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of batteries

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

Lithium ‘doping’ turns graphene into a superconductor

11.09.2015 | ExtremeTech | www.extremetech.com

Scientists from Canada and Europe have published results showing that “decoration” of graphene samples with lithium can change the behavior of electrons passing through it and turn the super-material into a superconductor.

It’s a property that was first predicted by a super-computer, now confirmed through physical experiment. It’s a breakthrough that could herald a new age of graphene electronics - though it’s still got a long way to go.

Graphene made into superconductor

Graphene is often referred to as having very low electrical resistance - and it does - but the reality is that when compared with a true superconductor, a shielded wire made of graphene may as well be a block of wood. Superconductors are finicky, technical creations that depend on just one property for their definition: 100% of any electricity put into a superconducting system at one end must come out the other, unhindered by resistance of any kind.

There are still very low temperatures involved here. The “decoration” process in which the lithium atoms are attached takes place at just 8K, or -265.15 °C. Their measured transition temperature for superconducting graphene was even lower: 5.9K, or -267.25 °C.

That means that while graphene has been induced to have a truly incredible electrical property, it has not solved all our earthly technological problems. The big problem with the superconductors scientists have managed to create is that they all, like graphene, require cooling to “cryogenic” temperatures to work, meaning that we can’t create large or inexpensive quantities of superconductors for things like large-scale grid power upgrades or cheap fusion containment rigs.

Read more at ExtremeTech

Image Credit: Wikipedia

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