We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2021 was released on October 1st 2021. Its digital version will be available on November 1st 2021.

Topic: Power engineering; Electricity quality; Renewable Energy

Main article
Local specifics of South-Bohemian region regarding usage of alternative fuel cars

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2021 was released 9.17.2021. Its digital version will be available 9.17.2021.

Lighting installations
Lighting reconstruction of underpass and platforms of Ústí nad Orlicí railway station

Public lighting
The lighting of park at Episcopal Residence of Ostrava-Opava in Ostrava
Outdoor lighting systems and intrusive light
Generel of public lighting 9th part
Environmental viewpoint

LED Material Shines Under Strain

30. 8. 2021 | Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | www.lbl.gov

Smartphones, laptops, and lighting applications rely on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to shine bright. But the brighter these LED technologies shine, the more inefficient they become, releasing more energy as heat instead of light.

Now, as reported in the journal Science, a team led by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley has demonstrated an approach for achieving near 100% light-emission efficiency at all brightness levels. Their approach focuses on stretching or compressing a thin semiconductor film in a way that favorably changes its electronic structure.

LED material

The team identified just how the semiconductor’s electronic structure dictated interaction among the energetic particles within the material. Those particles sometimes collide and annihilate each other, losing energy as heat instead of emitting light in the process. Changing the material’s electronic structure reduced the likelihood for annihilation and led to a near-perfect conversion of energy to light, even at high brightness.

Read more at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Image Credit: Ali Javey/Berkeley Lab

-jk-