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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2020 was released on November 11th 2020. Its digital version will be available on December 2nd 2020.

Topic: Electrical switchboards and switchboard technology

Innovation, Technology, Projects
New energy law: an opportunity for energetics community
Data centres – third session
Starting October, REMA raises financial subsidy for recycling electrical devices

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2020 was released on September 18th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Optical radiation effects and use
Plants and light in biofil interior – Part 12
Plants and lights in public areas
Melanopic day illuminance in buildings

Fairs and exhibitions
FOR INTERIOR 2020: Inspiration for habitation and trends of furniture and interiors world

Lasers etch a ‘perfect’ solar energy absorber

5. 2. 2020 | University of Rochester | www.rochester.edu

The University of Rochester research lab that recently used lasers to create unsinkable metallic structures has now demonstrated how the same technology could be used to create highly efficient solar power generators.

Research, published in a Light: Science & Applications, describes using powerful femto-second laser pulses to etch metal surfaces with nanoscale structures that selectively absorb light only at the solar wavelengths, but not elsewhere. A regular metal surface is shiny and highly reflective. Years ago, the researchers developed a black metal technology that turned shiny metals pitch black. “But to make a perfect solar absorber we need more than a black metal and the result is this selective absorber.”

Solar energy absorber

The researchers experimented with aluminum, copper, steel, and tungsten, and found that tungsten, commonly used as a thermal solar absorber, had the highest solar absorption efficiency when treated with the new nanoscale structures. This improved the efficiency of thermal electrical generation by 130 percent compared to untreated tungsten.

Read more at University of Rochester

Image Credit: J. Adam Fenster

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