We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2017 was released on February 17th 2017. Its digital version will be available on March 10th 2017.

 

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective and signalling; Devices for smart grids

 

Main Article

Atypical concept of DC power supply source for high current consumption

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2017 was released on February 7th 2017. Its digital version will be available on March 7th 2017.

Fair and exhibitions
Invitation on LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition 

Architectural and scenic lighting
Lighting design in a nutshell
Spiegeltent illumination and its specificity

How solar energy could be the largest source of electricity by mid-century

12.01.2015 | |

The sun could be the world’s largest source of electricity by 2050, ahead of fossil fuels, wind, hydro and nuclear, according to a pair of reports issued today by the International Energy Agency (IEA). The two IEA technology roadmaps show how solar photovoltaic (PV) systems could generate up to 16% of the world’s electricity by 2050 while solar thermal electricity (STE) from concentrating solar power (CSP) plants could provide an additional 11%. Combined, these solar technologies could prevent the emission of more than 6 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide per year by 2050 – that is more than all current energy-related CO2 emissions from the United States or almost all of the direct emissions from the transport sector worldwide today.

The two documents underline the complementary role of the two technologies. With 137 GW of capacity installed worldwide at the end of 2013 and adding up to 100 MW each day, PV deployment so far has been much faster than that of STE, mainly thanks to massive cost reductions. Under the scenario described in the roadmaps, most of the growth of solar electricity comes from PV until 2030. However, the picture changes afterwards. When reaching shares between 5% and 15% of annual electricity generation, PV starts to lose value in wholesale markets. Massive-scale STE deployment takes off at this stage thanks to CSP plants’ built-in thermal storage, which allows for generation of electricity when demand peaks in late afternoon and in the evening, thus complementing PV generation.

PV expands globally, with China being by far the leading country, followed by the United States. Over half of total capacity is situated at the final consumers’ place – whether households, shopping malls or industries. STE expands in very sunny areas with clear skies, becoming a major opportunity for Africa, India, the Middle East and the United States

read the whole IEA report at www.iea.org

Image credit Wikimedia Commons

 

(pp)