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Current issue

ELEKTRO 8-9/2019 was released on September 3rd 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electrical engineering in industry; 61th International Engineering Fair in Brno

Main Article
Residual current devices – overview and usage

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2019 was released on September 16th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Professional organizations activities
International conference LIGHT (SVĚTLO) 2019 – 6th announcement
We participated in International commission on illumination CIE 2019 congress in Washington
Technical colloquium SLOVALUX 2019

Fairs and exhibitions
Inspire with boho styl and design of Far East at autumn fair FOR INTERIOR

‘Hot spots’ increase efficiency of solar desalination

19.06.2019 | Rice University | www.rice.edu

Researchers in Rice’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP) showed they could boost the efficiency of their solar-powered desalination system by more than 50% simply by adding inexpensive plastic lenses to concentrate sunlight into “hot spots.” The results are available online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“The typical way to boost performance in solar-driven systems is to add solar concentrators and bring in more light,” said Pratiksha Dongare, a graduate student in applied physics at Rice’s Brown School of Engineering and co-lead author of the paper. “The big difference here is that we’re using the same amount of light. We’ve shown it’s possible to inexpensively redistribute that power and dramatically increase the rate of purified water production.”

Solar desalination

Dongare and colleagues, including study co-lead author Alessandro Alabastri, coat the top layer of their membranes with low-cost, commercially available nanoparticles that are designed to convert more than 80% of sunlight energy into heat. The solar-driven nanoparticle heating reduces production costs, and Rice engineers are working to scale up the technology for applications in remote areas that have no access to electricity.

Read more at Rice University

Image Credit: Pratiksha Dongare

-jk-