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Who Were the First.

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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2018 was released on June 27th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 27th 2018.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering; Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Parametrization of circuit models of Li-accumulators for electromobility
Smart Cities (part 3 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2018 was released on July 30th 2018. Its digital version will be available on August 31th 2018.

Refreshing our memory
Eccentric luminaires of René Roubíček from the years1965 till 1977
Bases of photometry – 1st part
Great personage of Czech science of times after Battle at Bílá hora: doctor, naturalist, philosopher and physicist Jan Marek Marci from Kronland

Optical radiation effects and use
The light and circadian rhythms

Graphene-based wearable e-textiles move closer to commercial production

20.12.2017 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

The market for e-textile clothing is forecasted to reach $5 billion by 2027, according to the market research firm IDTechEX. And while graphene is expected to be one of the most prominent materials in wearable e-textiles, currently there is no good way to manufacture graphene-based e-textiles on an industrial scale.

To address this problem, a team of researchers led by Professor Kostya S. Novoselov at The University of Manchester have developed a scalable process to manufacture graphene-based wearable e-textiles on an industrial scale. As they write in their paper published in a recent issue of ACS Nano, the method could allow graphene e-textiles to be manufactured at commercial production rates of 150 meters per minute.

Wearable e-textiles

In the new method, the team has reversed the previous process of coating textiles with graphene-based materials. Traditionally, the textiles are first coated with graphene oxide, and then the graphene oxide is reduced to its functional form of reduced graphene oxide. Instead, here the researchers first reduced the graphene oxide in solution, and then coated the textiles with the reduced form.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: American Chemical Society

-jk-