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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2016 was released on September 27th 2016. Its digital version will be available on October 27th 2016.


Topic: 22nd International trade fair ELO SYS 2016; Electrical Power Engineering; RES; Emergency Power Units


Main Article

Power system management under utilization of Smart Grid system

Printed edition of SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2016 was released on September 19th 2016. Its digital version will be available immediately.


Standards, regulations and recommendations

Regulation No 10/2016 (Prague building code) from the view of building lighting technology


Lighting installations

PROLICHT CZECH – supplier of lighting for new SAP offices

Hold up the light to see in work your work

Modern and saving LED lifting of swimming pool hall

First Iceland power plant turns carbon emissions to stone

10.06.2016 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Scientists and engineers working at a major power plant in Iceland have shown for the first time that carbon dioxide emissions can be pumped into the earth and changed chemically to a solid within months—radically faster than anyone had predicted.

The finding may help address a fear that so far has plagued the idea of capturing and storing CO2 underground: that emissions could seep back into the air or even explode out.

Changing carbon dioxide to stone

The Hellisheidi power plant is the world's largest geothermal facility; it and a companion plant provide the energy for Iceland's capital, Reykjavik, plus power for industry, by pumping up volcanically heated water to run turbines. But the process is not completely clean; it also brings up volcanic gases, including carbon dioxide and nasty-smelling hydrogen sulfide.

Under a pilot project called Carbfix, started in 2012, the plant began mixing the gases with the water pumped from below and reinjecting the solution into the volcanic basalt below. In nature, when basalt is exposed to carbon dioxide and water, a series of natural chemical reactions takes place, and the carbon precipitates out into a whitish, chalky mineral. But no one knew how fast this might happen if the process were harnessed for carbon storage.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Adobe Stock