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Current issue

ELEKTRO 8-9/2017 was released on September 5th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 5th 2017.

Topic: 59th International engineering fair in Brno; Electrical engineering in industry

Main Article
Fuel cells
Renaissance of synchronous reluctance motors
Actuator design working with electromagnetic field

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

Environmentally-friendly graphene textiles could enable wearable electronics

28.11.2016 | University of Cambridge | www.cam.ac.uk

A new method for producing conductive cotton fabrics using graphene-based inks opens up new possibilities for flexible and wearable electronics, without the use of expensive and toxic processing steps.

Wearable, textiles-based electronics present new possibilities for flexible circuits, healthcare and environment monitoring, energy conversion, and many others. Now, researchers at the Cambridge Graphene Centre (CGC) at the University of Cambridge, working in collaboration with scientists at Jiangnan University, China, have devised a method for depositing graphene-based inks onto cotton to produce a conductive textile. The work demonstrates a wearable motion sensor based on the conductive cotton.

Graphene-based textile for wearable electronics

Cotton fabric is among the most widespread for use in clothing and textiles, as it is breathable and comfortable to wear, as well as being durable to washing. These properties also make it an excellent choice for textile electronics. A new process is a low-cost, sustainable and environmentally-friendly method for making conductive cotton textiles by impregnating them with a graphene-based conductive ink.

The team of scientists created inks of chemically modified graphene flakes that are more adhesive to cotton fibres than unmodified graphene. Heat treatment after depositing the ink on the fabric improves the conductivity of the modified graphene.

Read more at University of Cambridge

Image Credit: Jiesheng Ren

-jk-