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Current issue

ELEKTRO 10/2020 was released on October 1st 2020. Its digital version will be available on October 30th 2020.

Topic: Power Engineering; Electricity transmission and distribution equipment

From Foreign Press
Protection from a faulty arc
Rack Unit

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2020 was released on September 18th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Optical radiation effects and use
Plants and light in biofil interior – Part 12
Plants and lights in public areas
Melanopic day illuminance in buildings

Fairs and exhibitions
FOR INTERIOR 2020: Inspiration for habitation and trends of furniture and interiors world

Engineers produce a fisheye lens that’s completely flat

21. 9. 2020 | MIT | www.mit.edu

To capture panoramic views in a single shot, photographers typically use fisheye lenses — ultra-wide-angle lenses made from multiple pieces of curved glass, which distort incoming light to produce wide, bubble-like images. Their spherical, multipiece design makes fisheye lenses inherently bulky and often costly to produce.

Now engineers at MIT and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell have designed a wide-angle lens that is completely flat. It is the first flat fisheye lens to produce crisp, 180-degree panoramic images. The design is a type of “metalens,” a wafer-thin material patterned with microscopic features that work together to manipulate light in a specific way.

Flat fish eye lens

In this case, the new fisheye lens consists of a single flat, millimeter-thin piece of glass covered on one side with tiny structures that precisely scatter incoming light to produce panoramic images, just as a conventional curved, multielement fisheye lens assembly would. The lens works in the infrared part of the spectrum, but the researchers say it could be modified to capture images using visible light as well.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: Mikhail Shalaginov, Tian Gu, Christine Daniloff, Felice Hankel, Juejun Hu

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