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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2020 was released on February 12th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrical apparatus, Internet of Things; Medical technologies

Main Article
Monitoring vacancy of an intelligent building

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2020 was released on February 3th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 3th 2020.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation for Light+Building 2020 – attendant programme
Prolicht+Sound fair celebrates the 25th birthday
FOR CITY 2020 introduces oneself in parallel to FOR ARCH fair

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modern trends in automobile headlamps

Engineers mix and match materials to make new stretchy electronics

07.02.2020 | MIT | www.mit.edu

At the heart of any electronic device is a cold, hard computer chip, covered in a miniature city of transistors and other semiconducting elements. Because computer chips are rigid, the electronic devices that they power, such as our smartphones, laptops, watches, and televisions, are similarly inflexible.

Now a process developed by MIT engineers may be the key to manufacturing flexible electronics with multiple functionalities in a cost-effective way. The process is called  “remote epitaxy” and involves growing thin films of semiconducting material on a large, thick wafer of the same material, which is covered in an intermediate layer of graphene. Once the researchers grow a semiconducting film, they can peel it away from the graphene-covered wafer and then reuse the wafer, which itself can be expensive depending on the type of material it’s made from. In this way, the team can copy and peel away any number of thin, flexible semiconducting films, using the same underlying wafer.

Flexible electronics components

The researchers expect that the process could be used to produce stretchy electronic films for a wide variety of uses, including virtual reality-enabled contact lenses, solar-powered skins that mold to the contours of your car, electronic fabrics that respond to the weather, and other flexible electronics that seemed until now to be the stuff of Marvel movies.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: Felice Frankel

-jk-