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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2017 was released on November 6th 2017. Its digital version will be available on November 27th 2017.

Topic: Electrical distribution switchboards and switchboard technology; Rotating electrical machines

Main Article
Analysis of the CFD settings for simulating the temperature field of sinusoidal filter
On-line optimisation of current commutation angles in phases of BLDC motor

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2017 was released on September 18th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 18th 2017.

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
MAYBE STYLE introducing LED design luminaires of German producer Lightnet
TREVOS – new luminaires for industry and offices
How many types of LED panels produces MODUS?
Intelligent LED luminaire RENO PROFI

Interiors lighting
The light in indoor flat interior – questions and answers

Energy-Harvesting Yarns Generate Electricity

25.08.2017 | University of Texas at Dallas | www.utdallas.edu

An international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea has developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted.

In a study published in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Science, researchers describe “twistron” yarns and their possible applications, such as harvesting energy from the motion of ocean waves or from temperature fluctuations. When sewn into a shirt, these yarns served as a self-powered breathing monitor.

Yarn generating electricity

The yarns are constructed from carbon nanotubes, which are hollow cylinders of carbon 10,000 times smaller in diameter than a human hair. The researchers first twist-spun the nanotubes into high-strength, lightweight yarns. To make the yarns highly elastic, they introduced so much twist that the yarns coiled like an over-twisted rubber band. In order to generate electricity, the yarns must be either submerged in or coated with an ionically conducting material, or electrolyte, which can be as simple as a mixture of ordinary table salt and water.

Read more at University of Texas at Dallas

Image Credit: University of Texas at Dallas

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