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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2020 was released on February 12th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrical apparatus, Internet of Things; Medical technologies

Main Article
Monitoring vacancy of an intelligent building

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2020 was released on February 3th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 3th 2020.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation for Light+Building 2020 – attendant programme
Prolicht+Sound fair celebrates the 25th birthday
FOR CITY 2020 introduces oneself in parallel to FOR ARCH fair

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modern trends in automobile headlamps

Electronic devices that can degrade and physically disappear on demand

04.09.2017 | TechXplore | www.techxplore.com

A team of researchers from the U.S. and China has demonstrated electronic devices that can degrade and disappear on demand using nothing but moisture in the air. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team describes their devices and offers ideas on applications that could benefit from them.

Most people know that electronic devices do not work particularly well in humid conditions—if your house is humid all the time, your desktop computer will not last very long, for example. This is because parts of the electronics fall prey to oxidation. In this new effort, the researchers took this knowledge to the extreme by building electronic devices from materials that degrade much faster than normal under humid conditions—so fast that the devices can actually disappear. They rely on a slightly different process—hydrolysis, which works due to the activation of corrosive acids in the materials used.

Degradeable electronics

Researchers have previously made other such devices, known collectively as transient electronics, but they only operated in aqueous solutions and were degraded by water molecules. To achieve roughly the same effect, the researchers searched for and found a material that is already known to degrade in humid environments—the polymer polyanhydride. The team integrated the polymer with electronic components by applying it in thin films.

¨Read more at TechXplore

Image Credit: Gao et al., Sci. Adv. 2017

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