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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2017 was released on December 6th 2017. Its digital version will be available on January 5th 2018.

Topic: Measurement, measuring devices and engineering; Testing and diagnostics

Main Article
Measurements on rotating machines using SFRA method
Application possibilities of ultra-capacitors or LiFePO4 batteries in trolley network of the Brno Public Transit Company

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2017 was released on December 11th 2017. Its digital version will be available on january 11th 2018.

Lighting installations
The lighting of university building Centrale Supélec in Saclay in France
The light for our future

Daylight
Application and judgment light guides Solatube®

Electrically tunable metasurfaces pave the way toward dynamic holograms

03.03.2017 | Applied Physics Letters | aip.scitation.org

Dynamic holograms allow three-dimensional images to change over time like a movie, but so far these holograms are still being developed. The development of dynamic holograms may now get a boost from recent research on optical metasurfaces, a type of photonic surface with tunable optical properties.

A metasurface is a thin sheet consisting of a periodic array of nanoscale elements. The exact dimensions of these elements is critical, since they are specifically designed to manipulate certain wavelengths of light in particular ways that enhance their electric and magnetic properties.

Dynamic holograms

Here, the scientists demonstrated how to manipulate a metasurface by applying an electrical voltage. By switching the control voltage “on” and “off,” the researchers could change the optical transmission of the metasurface. For instance, they could tune the transmission from opaque to the transparent regime for certain wavelengths, achieving a transmittance change of up to 75%. The voltage switch could also change the phase of certain wavelengths by up to 180°.

Read more at Applied Physics Letters

Image Credit: Applied Physics Letters

-jk-