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Current issue

ELEKTRO 3/2019 was released on March 11th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 11th 2019.

Topic: Amper 2019 – 271 International trade fair for electrical engineering

Main Article
Smart Cities (part 8)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2019 was released on March 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Architectural and scenic lighting
The architectural lighting of Bečov nad Teplou castle
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 41
The analyse of light picture a little more theoretic

Day light
Biggest mistakes in day lighting design of buildings

Digitally printed cyanobacteria can power small electronic devices

27.11.2017 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

Researchers have used a simple inkjet printer to print a “bio-ink” of cyanobacteria onto a conductive surface, creating a biophotovoltaic cell. Unlike conventional photovoltaic cells that operate only when exposed to light, the cyanobacteria can generate an electric current both in the dark and in response to light.

The researchers expect that the cell may serve as an environmentally friendly power supply for low-power devices such as biosensors, and can even be scaled up to print a bioenergy wallpaper. The scientists, at Imperial College London and University of Cambridge, have published a paper on the new biophotovoltaic cell in a recent issue of Nature Communications.

Bio degradable cell

Our biophotovoltaic device is biodegradable and in the future could serve as a disposable solar panel and battery that can decompose in our composts or gardens,” coauthor Marin Sawa at University of Arts London and Imperial College London told Phys.org. “Cheap, accessible, environmentally friendly, biodegradable batteries without any heavy metals and plastics—this is what we and our environment really need but don't have just yet, and our work has shown that it is possible to have that.”

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: M. Sawa

-jk-