We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2019 was released on July 29th 2019. Its digital version will be available on August 29th 2019.

Lighting installations
Foxtrot controls new location of barmans
Dynamic illumination of Guardian Angels’ chapel in Sušice

Accessories of lighting installations
Safety, austerity and comfort with KNX
Worldwide first LED switching source with KNX interface from MEAN WELL producer
KNX – the system with future
Schmachtl – connector installation gesis

Dielectric Metamaterial is Dynamically Tuned by Light

02.05.2018 | Duke University | www.duke.edu

Researchers at Duke University have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. The approach could form the basis for technologies ranging from improved security scanners to new types of visual displays.

A metamaterial is an artificial material that manipulates waves like light and sound through properties of its structure rather than its chemistry. Researchers can design these materials to have rare or unnatural properties, like the ability to absorb specific ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum or to bend light backward.

Non-metal metamaterial

In the new technology, each grid location contains a tiny silicon cylinder just 50 microns tall and 120 microns wide, with the cylinders spaced 170 microns apart from one another. While silicon is not normally a conductive material, the researchers bombard the cylinders with a specific frequency of light in a process called photodoping. This imbues the typically insulating material with metallic properties by exciting electrons on the cylinders’ surfaces.

Read more at Duke University

Image Credit: Duke University

-jk-