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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2019 was released on July 29th 2019. Its digital version will be available on August 29th 2019.

Lighting installations
Foxtrot controls new location of barmans
Dynamic illumination of Guardian Angels’ chapel in Sušice

Accessories of lighting installations
Safety, austerity and comfort with KNX
Worldwide first LED switching source with KNX interface from MEAN WELL producer
KNX – the system with future
Schmachtl – connector installation gesis

Customised silicone heart valves

24.07.2019 | ETH Zurich | ethz.ch

Scientists at ETH Zurich and the South African company Strait Access Technologies are using 3D printing to produce custom-made artificial heart valves from silicone. This could help meet an ageing population’s growing demand for replacement heart valves.

The human heart has four chambers, each equipped with a valve to ensure blood flow in one direction only. If any of the heart valves are leaking, narrowed or distended (or even ruptured), the blood runs back into the atria or ventricles, putting the entire heart under severe strain. In the worst case, this can lead to arrhythmia or even heart failure.

Artificial heart valves

The new model has several advantages over conventional heart valves: the silicone heart valve can be tailored more precisely to the patient, as the researchers first determine the individual shape and size of the leaky heart valve using computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. This makes it possible to print a heart valve that fits the patient’s heart chamber perfectly. The material used is also compatible with the human body, while the blood flow through the artificial heart valve is as good as with conventional replacement valves.

Read more at ETH Zurich

Image Credit: Fergal Coulter / ETH Zurich

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