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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2018 was released on December 12th 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 1st 2019.

Topic: Measurement engineering and measuring instruments; Testing industry and diagnostics

Main Article
Thermovision measurement in electrical power engineering
Smart Cities (part 5)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2018 was released on December 3rd 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2019.

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modular floodlights Siteco
Decorative luminaire PRESBETON H-E-X from the integral series town equipment
LED luminaires ESALITE – revolution in sphere of industrial lighting

Daylight
About median illumination by daylight
Professional colloquium Daylight in practice

Could bread mould build a better rechargeable battery?

18.03.2016 | University of Dundee | www.dundee.ac.uk

A naturally occurring red bread mould could be the key to producing more sustainable electrochemical materials for use in rechargeable batteries, researchers at the University of Dundee have found.

Their findings have shown for the first time that that the fungus Neurospora crassa – commonly known as red bread mould – can transform manganese into a mineral composite with favourable electrochemical properties.

Mould helping to improve batteries

The researchers combined the fungus with urea and manganese chloride and watched what happened. The combination of these factors resulted in a ‘biomineralised’’ product which was subsequently subjected to intense heat treatment. This produced a mixture of carbonised biomass and manganese oxides.

Tests on these structures showed that they have ideal electrochemical properties for use in supercapacitors or lithium-ion batteries. The carbonised fungal biomass-mineral composite was found to retain 90% of its capacity after 200 cycles of charging, making it an ideal target for using in rechargeable batteries.

Read more at University of Dundee

Image Credit: Wikipedia

-jk-