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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2019 was released on July 29th 2019. Its digital version will be available on August 29th 2019.

Lighting installations
Foxtrot controls new location of barmans
Dynamic illumination of Guardian Angels’ chapel in Sušice

Accessories of lighting installations
Safety, austerity and comfort with KNX
Worldwide first LED switching source with KNX interface from MEAN WELL producer
KNX – the system with future
Schmachtl – connector installation gesis

Converting food waste into solid fuels, biodiesel and other products

23.04.2015 | Biodiesel Magazine | biodieselmagazine.com

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that “a third of all the food produced in the world is never consumed,” totalling about 1.3 billion tons of waste a year. The U.S. alone wastes 40 percent of all food, worth an estimated $165 billion.

This waste decays in landfills and, without oxygen present, emits methane, which is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. This alarming figure led researchers at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Engineering and Applied Science to investigate alternatives to landfilling organic wastes.

The researchers have since developed a breakthrough synergistic technology that uses anaerobic digestion (AD) to turn nutrient-rich organic materials into fuel (biogas), fertilizer, or soil conditioner, while using the carbon dioxide fraction of the biogas to grow algae. Simultaneously, lipid oils in the algae are also extracted and converted to biodiesel.

This novel process, which essentially integrates algae production with AD, allows researchers to almost completely utilize the carbon found in food waste in a renewable manner.

Equipment used to promote growth of algae.

 Food waste from UC's Center Court.

 The UC project integrates AD with algae growth, the lipids from which is used for biodiesel production.

Read more...ceas.uc.edu

Image credit: University of Cincinnati

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