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Current issue

ELEKTRO 8-9/2019 was released on September 3rd 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electrical engineering in industry; 61th International Engineering Fair in Brno

Main Article
Residual current devices – overview and usage

SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2019 was released on September 16th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Professional organizations activities
International conference LIGHT (SVĚTLO) 2019 – 6th announcement
We participated in International commission on illumination CIE 2019 congress in Washington
Technical colloquium SLOVALUX 2019

Fairs and exhibitions
Inspire with boho styl and design of Far East at autumn fair FOR INTERIOR

Concrete That Heals Itself

02.06.2015 | CleanTechnica | cleantechnica.com

Concrete and bacteria are not often seen as sharing the same construction armchair, that is, unless you happen to be discussing concrete that heals itself. Henk Jonkers from Netherlands-based Delft University of Technology has created bioconcrete, a product that can heal its own cracks and faults.

Jonkers says he originally began work on the bioconcrete when he was approached by a concrete technologist who wondered whether the safety of concrete could be improved using a biological solution.

It has taken Jonkers and his team three years to produce this self-healing prototype, needing to overcome the most obvious obstacle: finding bacteria that can survive the harsh environment of concrete.

“It’s a rock-like, stone-like material, very dry,” said Jonkers. To address this dry hardship, the team picked bacillus bacteria for its hardiness and longevity. The bacteria and its food source, calcium lactate, are packed into tiny capsules that dissolve when water enters the concrete cracks. Once released, the bacteria consume the calcium lactate, causing a chemical reaction that creates limestone, which then fills in the gaps.

Read more...cleantechnica.com

Image credit: European Patent Office

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