We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 8-9/2020 was released on September 3th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electrical engineering in industry; Industrial automation elements

Market, Business, Enterprise
Digital transformation

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2020 was released on September 18th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Optical radiation effects and use
Plants and light in biofil interior – Part 12
Plants and lights in public areas
Melanopic day illuminance in buildings

Fairs and exhibitions
FOR INTERIOR 2020: Inspiration for habitation and trends of furniture and interiors world

Chemists make tough plastics recyclable

22. 7. 2020 | MIT | www.mit.edu

Thermosets, which include epoxies, polyurethanes, and rubber used for tires, are found in many products that have to be durable and heat-resistant, such as cars or electrical appliances. One drawback to these materials is that they typically cannot be easily recycled or broken down after use, because the chemical bonds holding them together are stronger than those found in other materials such as thermoplastics.

MIT chemists have now developed a way to modify thermoset plastics with a chemical linker that makes the materials much easier to break down, but still allows them to retain the mechanical strength that makes them so useful. In a study appearing today in Nature, the researchers showed that they could produce a degradable version of a thermoset plastic called pDCPD, break it down into a powder, and use the powder to create more pDCPD. They also proposed a theoretical model suggesting that their approach could be applicable to a wide range of plastics and other polymers, such as rubber.

Recyclable touch plastic

This work unveils a fundamental design principle that we believe is general to any kind of thermoset with this basic architecture,” says Jeremiah Johnson, an associate professor of chemistry at MIT and the senior author of the study. The researchers are now hoping to form a company to license and commercialize the technology.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: Stock image

-jk-