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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2019 was released on July 29th 2019. Its digital version will be available on August 29th 2019.

Lighting installations
Foxtrot controls new location of barmans
Dynamic illumination of Guardian Angels’ chapel in Sušice

Accessories of lighting installations
Safety, austerity and comfort with KNX
Worldwide first LED switching source with KNX interface from MEAN WELL producer
KNX – the system with future
Schmachtl – connector installation gesis

Changing the color of 3-D printed objects

29.01.2018 | MIT | news.mit.edu

3-D printing has come a long way since the first rapid prototyping patent was rejected in 1980. The technology has evolved from basic designs to a wide range of highly-customizable objects. Still, there’s a big issue: Once objects are printed, they’re final. If you need a change, you’ll need a reprint.

But imagine if that weren’t the case — if, for example, you could change the color of your smartphone case or earrings on demand. Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have gotten closer to making that a reality. In a new paper, they present ColorFab, a method for repeatedly changing the colors of 3-D printed objects, after fabrication.

Changing the color of 3-D objects

Using their own 3-D printable ink that changes color when exposed to ultraviolet light, the team can recolor a multicolored object in just over 20 minutes — and they say they expect that number to decrease significantly with future improvements.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: MIT

-jk-