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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2019 was released on February 13th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 11th 2019.

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective, signalling and special

Main Article
Advanced power converter topology
Smart Cities (part 7)

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2019 was released on February 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation at LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition
Prolight + Sound 2019: keep up with time
The light at For Arch 2018 fair

Public lighting
Lights of towns and communities 2018 – the meeting at the round table

Bendable electronic paper shows full colour scale

15.10.2016 | Chalmers University of Technology | www.chalmers.se

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed the basis for a new electronic paper that is less than a micrometre thin, flexible and giving all the colours that a regular LED display does, but still needs ten times less energy than a Kindle tablet.

When researchers from University of Technology were working on placing conductive polymers on nanostructures they discovered that the combination would be perfectly suited to creating electronic displays as thin as paper. A year later the results were ready for publication. A material that is less than a micrometre thin, flexible and giving all the colours that a standard LED display does while needing ten times less energy than a Kindle tablet.

Special flexible electronic paper

The ‘paper’ is similar to the Kindle tablet. It isn’t lit up like a standard display, but rather reflects the external light which illuminates it. Therefore it works very well where there is bright light, such as out in the sun, in contrast to standard LED displays that work best in darkness. At the same time it needs only a tenth of the energy that a Kindle tablet uses, which itself uses much less energy than a tablet LED display.

Read more at Chalmers University of Technology

Image Credit: Chalmers University of Technology

-jk-