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Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2020 was released on June 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available on June 24th 2020.

Topic: Electrical machines, drives and power electronics, electromobility

Main Article
New traction power supply technology 25 kV/50 Hz (part 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

Autonomous car finishes record-setting trip in Mexico

2. 11. 2015 | University of Nevada, Reno | www.unr.edu

Professor Raul Rojas of the University of Nevada, Reno just drove 1,500 miles without hands - from the U.S. border at Nogales to Mexico City - in his autonomous car. It is the longest-ever autonomous drive in Mexico.

With several terabytes of data describing the highways, and with specialized software, the onboard computer guided the car on city streets and highways through the Sonoran Desert, along the west coast of Mexico, up to Guadalajara and then to its final destination of the National Polytechnic University, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, in Mexico City.

Record for an autonomous car

This trip along Mexico's Highway 15 sets, by far, a new personal best for Rojas, as his autonomous car, a 2010 Volkswagen Passat Variant, had already driven 190 miles round trip between Berlin and Leipzig, Germany. The car is equipped with a highly precise GPS system and specialized equipment that allows it to follow a pre-set route, and then drive on its own with other systems controlling speed, direction and braking. A roof antenna receives GPS satellite signals from which a computer calculates the position of the car on the earth's surface.

Read more at University of Nevada, Reno

Image Credit: University of Nevada, Reno

-jk-