We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2018 was released on June 27th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 27th 2018.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering; Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Parametrization of circuit models of Li-accumulators for electromobility
Smart Cities (part 3 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2018 was released on July 30th 2018. Its digital version will be available on August 31th 2018.

Refreshing our memory
Eccentric luminaires of René Roubíček from the years1965 till 1977
Bases of photometry – 1st part
Great personage of Czech science of times after Battle at Bílá hora: doctor, naturalist, philosopher and physicist Jan Marek Marci from Kronland

Optical radiation effects and use
The light and circadian rhythms

Autonomous car finishes record-setting trip in Mexico

02.11.2015 | University of Nevada, Reno | www.unr.edu

Professor Raul Rojas of the University of Nevada, Reno just drove 1,500 miles without hands - from the U.S. border at Nogales to Mexico City - in his autonomous car. It is the longest-ever autonomous drive in Mexico.

With several terabytes of data describing the highways, and with specialized software, the onboard computer guided the car on city streets and highways through the Sonoran Desert, along the west coast of Mexico, up to Guadalajara and then to its final destination of the National Polytechnic University, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, in Mexico City.

Record for an autonomous car

This trip along Mexico's Highway 15 sets, by far, a new personal best for Rojas, as his autonomous car, a 2010 Volkswagen Passat Variant, had already driven 190 miles round trip between Berlin and Leipzig, Germany. The car is equipped with a highly precise GPS system and specialized equipment that allows it to follow a pre-set route, and then drive on its own with other systems controlling speed, direction and braking. A roof antenna receives GPS satellite signals from which a computer calculates the position of the car on the earth's surface.

Read more at University of Nevada, Reno

Image Credit: University of Nevada, Reno

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