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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2020 was released on February 12th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrical apparatus, Internet of Things; Medical technologies

Main Article
Monitoring vacancy of an intelligent building

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2020 was released on February 3th 2020. Its digital version will be available on March 3th 2020.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation for Light+Building 2020 – attendant programme
Prolicht+Sound fair celebrates the 25th birthday
FOR CITY 2020 introduces oneself in parallel to FOR ARCH fair

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modern trends in automobile headlamps

Antireflection coating makes plastic invisible

30.01.2019 | Penn State | www.psu.edu

Antireflection (AR) coatings on plastics have a multitude of practical applications, including glare reduction on eyeglasses, computer monitors and the display on your smart-phone when outdoors. Now, researchers at Penn State have developed an AR coating that improves on existing coatings to the extent that it can make transparent plastics, such as Plexiglas, virtually invisible.

"This discovery came about as we were trying to make higher-efficiency solar panels," said Chris Giebink, associate professor of electrical engineering, Penn State. "We would have liked to find an off-the-shelf solution, but there wasn't one that met our performance requirements," he said. "So, we started looking for our own solution."

Invisible plastic

In a paper recently posted online ahead of print in the journal Nano Letters, Giebink and coauthors describe a new process to bridge the gap between Teflon and air. They used a sacrificial molecule to create nanoscale pores in evaporated Teflon, thereby creating a graded index Teflon-air film that fools light into seeing a smooth transition from 1 to 1.5, eliminating essentially all reflections.

One unexpected application is in high altitude UAVs, or unmanned aerial vehicles. Because the technology is compatible with current manufacturing techniques, Giebink believes the coating technology is scalable and widely applicable.

Read more at Penn State

Image Credit: Giebink Lab/Penn State

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