We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrotechnics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2019 was released on June 26th 2019. Its digital version will be available on July 26th 2019.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering, Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Asset management and diagnostic needs in Industry 4.0

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2019 was released on July 29th 2019. Its digital version will be available on August 29th 2019.

Lighting installations
Foxtrot controls new location of barmans
Dynamic illumination of Guardian Angels’ chapel in Sušice

Accessories of lighting installations
Safety, austerity and comfort with KNX
Worldwide first LED switching source with KNX interface from MEAN WELL producer
KNX – the system with future
Schmachtl – connector installation gesis

Another Milestone in Hybrid Artificial Photosynthesis

06.01.2016 | Berkeley Lab | newscenter.lbl.gov

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) developing a bioinorganic hybrid approach to artificial photosynthesis have achieved another milestone.

Having generated quite a buzz with their hybrid system of semiconducting nanowires and bacteria that used electrons to synthesize carbon dioxide into acetate, the team has now developed a hybrid system that produces renewable molecular hydrogen and uses it to synthesize carbon dioxide into methane, the primary constituent of natural gas.

Artificial Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is the process by which nature harvests the energy in sunlight and uses it to synthesize carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. Carbohyrates are biomolecules that store the chemical energy used by living cells. In the original hybrid artificial photosynthesis system developed by the Berkeley Lab team, an array of silicon and titanium oxide nanowires collected solar energy and delivered electrons to microbes which used them to reduce carbon dioxide into a variety of value-added chemical products. In the new system, solar energy is used to split the water molecule into molecular oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen is then transported to microbes that use it to reduce carbon dioxide into one specific chemical product, methane.

Read more at Berkeley Lab

Image Credit: Berkeley Lab

-jk-