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ELEKTRO 4-5/2020 was released on May 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Topic: Electroinstallation; Lightning and overvoltage protection

Energetics
SüdOstLink
Energy law novel: An end to energy scammers

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2020 was released on March 6th 2020. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Market, business, enterprise
BOOBA in new showroom, which surpassed all expectations
Discourse with Technology of Capital city Prague chairman of management

Day light
Diagram of overshadow for 21st march
Modern methods of gaining dates for processing lighting technology assessment

Abundant element to power small devices

27. 4. 2020 | University of Tokyo | www.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/index.html

Researchers have found a way to convert heat energy into electricity with a nontoxic material. The material is mostly iron which is extremely cheap given its relative abundance. A generator based on this material could power small devices such as remote sensors or wearable devices. The material can be thin so it could be shaped into various forms.

"So far, all the study on thermoelectric generation has focused on the established but limited Seebeck effect,” said Nakatsuji. “In contrast, we focused on a relatively less familiar phenomenon called the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE).” ANE produces a voltage perpendicular to the direction of a temperature gradient across the surface of a suitable material. The phenomenon could help simplify the design of thermoelectric generators and enhance their conversion efficiency if the right materials become more readily available.

Powering small devices

We made a material that is 75 percent iron and 25 percent aluminum (Fe3Al) or gallium (Fe3Ga) by a process called doping,” said Sakai. “This significantly boosted ANE. We saw a twentyfold jump in voltage compared to undoped samples, which was exciting to see.”

Read more at University of Tokyo

Image Credit: University of Tokyo

-jk-