We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2018 was released on June 27th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 27th 2018.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable engineering; Tools, equipment and accessories for work with cables

Main Article
Parametrization of circuit models of Li-accumulators for electromobility
Smart Cities (part 3 – volume 1)

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2018 was released on July 30th 2018. Its digital version will be available on August 31th 2018.

Refreshing our memory
Eccentric luminaires of René Roubíček from the years1965 till 1977
Bases of photometry – 1st part
Great personage of Czech science of times after Battle at Bílá hora: doctor, naturalist, philosopher and physicist Jan Marek Marci from Kronland

Optical radiation effects and use
The light and circadian rhythms

A 'telehandshake' between the ISS and Earth

28.12.2015 | Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt | www.dlr.de

Although it is a simple gesture of greeting, it nevertheless remains an extraordinary moment; a handshake between an astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS) and researchers from the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR).

Space Justin DLR

Remotely controlled from the ISS, SpaceJustin, DLR's humanoid robot in Oberpfaffenhofen, acted as a proxy in these interactive pleasantries on 17 December 2015. The Russian cosmonaut Sergey Volkov on the ISS and Alin Albu-Schäffer, Head of the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, on Earth could see each other, converse and – thanks to force feedback – feel the pressure and movement of the handshake.

"The Kontur-2 technology experiment has allowed DLR to take another major step forward in robotics. This is the first time that we have succeeded in using a humanoid robot to implement force feedback between an astronaut orbiting the planet and a human being on Earth," emphasises Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the DLR Executive Board. "The scientific results of this project will open the door to a broad spectrum of applications – ranging from planetary exploration to more 'earthly' areas in telemedicine and telepresence for people who find themselves in critical situations." In telepresence systems, robot operators use robotic avatars located a long distance away to act in their place – almost as if they were there.

Read more at www.dlr.de

Image Credit DLR