We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 6/2018 was released on June 6th 2018. Its digital version will be available on June 26th 2018.

Topic: Rotating electrical machines, drives and power electronics; Electromobility

Main Article
Energy platform for vehicle-to-grid/home system
Smart Cities (part 2 – volume 2)

SVĚTLO (Light) 3/2018 was released on June 15th 2018. Its digital version will be available on July 17th 2018.

Accessories of lighting installations
Evening with Foxtrot on the Czech heaven

Public lighting
Timeless luminaire for public lighting – Streetlight 11
Control of public lighting

A small, modular, efficient fusion plant

14.08.2015 | MIT News | newsoffice.mit.edu

It’s an old joke that many fusion scientists have grown tired of hearing: Practical nuclear fusion power plants are just 30 years away - and always will be.

But now, finally, the joke may no longer be true: Advances in magnet technology have enabled researchers at MIT to propose a new design for a practical compact tokamak fusion reactor - and it’s one that might be realized in as little as a decade, they say. The era of practical fusion power, which could offer a nearly inexhaustible energy resource, may be coming near.

Using these new commercially available superconductors, rare-earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting tapes, to produce high-magnetic field coils “just ripples through the whole design,” says Dennis Whyte, a professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering and director of MIT’s Plasma Science and Fusion Center. “It changes the whole thing.”

New desing of fusion plant

The stronger magnetic field makes it possible to produce the required magnetic confinement of the superhot plasma - that is, the working material of a fusion reaction - but in a much smaller device than those previously envisioned. The reduction in size, in turn, makes the whole system less expensive and faster to build, and also allows for some ingenious new features in the power plant design.

Read more at MIT News

Image Credit: MIT

-jk-