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Current issue

ELEKTRO 1/2020 was released on January 20th 2020. Its digital version will be available on February 12th 2020.

Topic: Electrotechnology; Materials for electrical engineering; Wiring materia

Main Article
Using mHealth technolgy for automated data collection and transmission

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2019 was released on December 9th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 9th 2020.

Professional organizations activities
Light technology konference of Visegrád countries LUMEN V4 2020 – 1st announcement
23rd International conference SVĚTLO – LIGHT 2019
56th Conference of Society for development public lighting in Plzeň
What is new in CIE

Interiors lighting
Halla illuminated new Booking.com offices in Prague centre

A self-cleaning surface that repels even the deadliest superbugs

16.12.2019 | McMaster University | www.mcmaster.ca

A team of researchers at McMaster University has developed a self-cleaning surface that can repel all forms of bacteria, preventing the transfer of antibiotic-resistant superbugs and other dangerous bacteria in settings ranging from hospitals to kitchens.

The new plastic surface – a treated form of conventional transparent wrap – can be shrink-wrapped onto door handles, railings, IV stands and other surfaces that can be magnets for bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile. The treated material is also ideal for food packaging, where it could stop the accidental transfer of bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella and listeria from raw chicken, meat and other foods, as described in a paper published today by the journal ACS Nano.

Bactery repeling surface

Inspired by the water-repellent lotus leaf, the new surface works through a combination of nano-scale surface engineering and chemistry. The surface is textured with microscopic wrinkles that exclude all external molecules. A drop of water or blood, for example, simply bounces away when it lands on the surface. The same is true for bacteria.

Read more at McMaster University

Image Credit: Georgia Kirkos

-jk-