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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2021 was released on October 1st 2021. Its digital version will be available on November 1st 2021.

Topic: Power engineering; Electricity quality; Renewable Energy

Main article
Local specifics of South-Bohemian region regarding usage of alternative fuel cars

SVĚTLO (Light) 4-5/2021 was released 9.17.2021. Its digital version will be available 9.17.2021.

Lighting installations
Lighting reconstruction of underpass and platforms of Ústí nad Orlicí railway station

Public lighting
The lighting of park at Episcopal Residence of Ostrava-Opava in Ostrava
Outdoor lighting systems and intrusive light
Generel of public lighting 9th part
Environmental viewpoint

A new way to solve the ‘hardest of the hard’ computer problems

22. 9. 2021 | Ohio State University | www.osu.edu

A relatively new type of computing that mimics the way the human brain works was already transforming how scientists could tackle some of the most difficult information processing problems. Now, researchers have found a way to make what is called reservoir computing work between 33 and a million times faster, with significantly fewer computing resources and less data input needed.

In fact, in one test of this next-generation reservoir computing, researchers solved a complex computing problem in less than a second on a desktop computer. Using the now current state-of-the-art technology, the same problem requires a supercomputer to solve and still takes much longer. Reservoir computing is a machine learning algorithm developed in the early 2000s and used to solve the “hardest of the hard” computing problems, such as forecasting the evolution of dynamical systems that change over time. Previous research has shown that reservoir computing is well-suited for learning dynamical systems and can provide accurate forecasts about how they will behave in the future.

Reservoir Computing

It does that through the use of an artificial neural network, somewhat like a human brain. Scientists feed data on a dynamical network into a “reservoir” of randomly connected artificial neurons in a network. The network produces useful output that the scientists can interpret and feed back into the network, building a more and more accurate forecast of how the system will evolve in the future.

Read more at Ohio State University

Image Credit: Unsplash

-jk-