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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2018 was released on February 14th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 12th 2018.

Topic: Electrical devices; Devices for smart grids; Internet of Things

Main Article
Power flow control in grid using power converters

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2018 was released on February 5th 2018. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2018.

Architectural and scenic lighting
Mexican light
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 34
Lighting technology documentation – part 2 Schemes for scenic lighting

Luminaires and luminous apparatuses
NITECO LED luminaires – guarantied lifespan and warm white light not only for public lighting

A new-generation exoskeleton helps the paralyzed to walk

07.03.2016 | UC Berkeley | news.berkeley.edu

Until recently, being paralyzed from the waist down meant using a wheelchair to get around. And although daily life is more accessible to wheelchair users, they still face physical and social limitations. But UC Berkeley’s Robotics and Human Engineering Laboratory has been working to change that.

The robotics lab, a team of graduate students led by mechanical engineering professor Homayoon Kazerooni, has been working for more than a decade to create robotic exoskeletons that allow those with limited mobility to walk again. This week, a new, lighter and more agile exoskeleton, for which the Kaz lab developed the original technology, was unveiled earlier this week: The Phoenix, by SuitX, a company that has spun off the robotics lab. Kazerooni is its founder and CEO.

New generation of exoskeletons

The Phoenix is lightweight, has two motors at the hips and electrically controlled tension settings that tighten when the wearer is standing and swing freely when they’re walking. Users can control the movement of each leg and walk up to 1.1 miles per hour by pushing buttons integrated into a pair of crutches. It’s powered for up to eight hours by a battery pack worn in a backpack.

Today, the Phoenix is one of the lightest and most accessible exoskeletons to hit the market. It can be adjusted to fit varied weights, heights and leg sizes and can be used for a range of mobility hindrances. And, although far from inexpensive at $40,000, it’s about the half the cost of other exoskeletons that help restore mobility.

Read more at UC Berkeley

Image Credit: UC Berkeley

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