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Current issue

ELEKTRO 2/2019 was released on February 13th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 11th 2019.

Topic: Electrical appliances – switching, protective, signalling and special

Main Article
Advanced power converter topology
Smart Cities (part 7)

SVĚTLO (Light) 1/2019 was released on February 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on March 5th 2019.

Fairs and exhibitions
Invitation at LIGHT IN ARCHITECTURE exhibition
Prolight + Sound 2019: keep up with time
The light at For Arch 2018 fair

Public lighting
Lights of towns and communities 2018 – the meeting at the round table

A flexible semiconductor for electronics, solar technology and photo catalysis

14.09.2016 | Technical University of Munich | www.tum.de

It is the double helix, with its stable and flexible structure of genetic information, that made life on Earth possible in the first place. Now a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a double helix structure in an inorganic material. The material comprising tin, iodine and phosphorus is a semiconductor with extraordinary optical and electronic properties, as well as extreme mechanical flexibility.

The substance called SnIP, comprising the elements tin (Sn), iodine (I) and phosphorus (P), is a semiconductor. However, unlike conventional inorganic semiconducting materials, it is highly flexible. The centimeter-long fibers can be arbitrarily bent without breaking.

Flexible semiconductor

The semiconducting properties of SnIP promise a wide range of application opportunities, from energy conversion in solar cells and thermoelectric elements to photocatalysts, sensors and optoelectronic elements. By doping with other elements, the electronic characteristics of the new material can be adapted to a wide range of applications.

Due to the arrangement of atoms in the form of a double helix, the fibers, which are up to a centimeter in length can be easily split into thinner strands. The thinnest fibers to date comprise only five double helix strands and are only a few nanometers thick. That opens the door also to nanoelectronic applications.

Read more at Technical University of Munich

Image Credit: Andreas Battenberg / TUM

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