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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2018 was released on December 12th 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 1st 2019.

Topic: Measurement engineering and measuring instruments; Testing industry and diagnostics

Main Article
Thermovision measurement in electrical power engineering
Smart Cities (part 5)

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2018 was released on December 3rd 2018. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2019.

Luminaires and light apparatuses
Modular floodlights Siteco
Decorative luminaire PRESBETON H-E-X from the integral series town equipment
LED luminaires ESALITE – revolution in sphere of industrial lighting

Daylight
About median illumination by daylight
Professional colloquium Daylight in practice

A 3-D printer that can print data sets as physical objects

04.06.2018 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

A team of researchers from MIT and Harvard University has come up with a way to get 3-D printers to print objects using data sets rather than geometric representations. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their new technique and some of the ways they believe it could be used.

Anyone who has seen a modern 3-D printer in action knows that there is a lot of room for improvement. Printed objects are generally a single color and have a blob-like quality. In this new effort, the team at MIT has developed a technique that uses actual data describing an object to print the desired object. The result is comparable to moving from a dot-matrix printer to a laser printer.

3D printing from data set

The new technique converts data that describes the digitized image to voxels (3-D pixels). That allows the printer to print voxels instead of shapes, with incredible precision—currently at a resolution of 2.3 million voxels per cubic centimeter.

Read more at Phys.org

 

Image Credit: Science Advances

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