We Continue the Work of Those
Who Were the First.

  • Electrical Engineering
  • Light & Lighting
  • Power Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Automation
  • Communication
  • Smart Buildings
  • Industry
  • Innovation

Current issue

ELEKTRO 4/2017 was released on April 12th 2017. Its digital version will be available on May 5th 2017.

Topic: Electroinstallations; Intelligent buildings; Building Fairs Brno 2017

Main Article

Application design for monitoring technological processes in an administration building

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2017 was released on March 17th 2017. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Fair and exhibitions
Inspired lighting from foreign fairs 

Accessories of lighting installations
On lighting operation is possible to save with minimum investments
Maxos fusion – new Philips Quit assembling system
Inteligent solution Dalisys® for control lighting

3D printing enables the smallest complex micro-objectives

12.08.2016 | University of Stuttgart | www.uni-stuttgart.de

3D printing revolutionized the manufacturing of complex shapes in the last few years. Using additive depositing of materials, where individual dots or lines are written sequentially, even the most complex devices could be realized fast and easy. Researchers at University of Stuttgart in Germany have used an ultrashort laser pulses in combination with optical photoresist to create optical lenses which are hardly larger than a human hair.

The femtosecond laser, with pulse durations smaller than 100 femtoseconds, is being focused in a microscope into liquid photoresist which rests on a glass substrate or an optical fiber. Two photons of the red laser beam with a wavelength of 785 nm are being absorbed simultaneously in the focus and expose the photoresist. This crosslinks the polymer and hardens it. The laser beam is directed with a scanner or by moving the substrate over the substrate. After exposure, the unexposed photoresist is washed away with a solvent. Only the hardened transparent polymer remains and forms the optical element.

3D print with laser

Using this method, optical free form surfaces can be created with sub-micrometer accuracy. The precision of the 3D laser writing allows not only for construction of common spherical lenses, but also the more ideal surfaces such as paraboloids or aspheres of higher order are possible. Particularly optical lens systems with two or more lenses can be realized for the first time with this method. This opens the door to aberration correction and microoptical imaging systems with unprecedented quality.

Read more at University of Stuttgart

Image Credit: University of Stuttgart

-jk-