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Current issue

ELEKTRO 7/2017 was released on June 26th 2017. Its digital version will be available on July 28th 2017.

Topic: Cables, conductors and cable technique; Connectors; Software; Marking and labelling

Main Article
Electrical insulation and thermal conductivity

SVĚTLO (Light) 4/2017 was released on August 8th 2017. Its digital version will be available on September 8th 2017.

Optical radiation effects and use
Glow-worm in a light engineer eyesight

Lighting installations
OSRAM TecDay Czech Republic 2017
Workroom illumination of Dominican provincial in Prague
innogy – reconstruction of company administrative centre

3-D printing with cellulose

06.03.2017 | MIT News | news.mit.edu

For centuries, cellulose has formed the basis of the world's most abundantly printed-on material: paper. Now, thanks to new research at MIT, it may also become an abundant material to print with—potentially providing a renewable, biodegradable alternative to the polymers currently used in 3-D printing materials.

The MIT team chose to work with cellulose acetate—a material that is easily made from cellulose and is already widely produced and readily available. Essentially, the number of hydrogen bonds in this material has been reduced by the acetate groups. Cellulose acetate can be dissolved in acetone and extruded through a nozzle. As the acetone quickly evaporates, the cellulose acetate solidifies in place. A subsequent optional treatment replaces the acetate groups and increases the strength of the printed parts.

3-D printing with cellulose

To demonstrate the chemical versatility of the production process, researchers added an extra dimension to the innovation. By adding a small amount of antimicrobial dye to the cellulose acetate ink, they 3-D-printed a pair of surgical tweezers with antimicrobial functionality.

Read more at MIT News

Image Credit: MIT News

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