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Current issue

ELEKTRO 11/2016 was released on November 7th 2016. Its digital version will be available on December 1st 2016.

 

Topic: Switchboards and switchboard engineering; Rotating electrical machines and power electronics; Maintenance of EE

 

Main Article

Lithium traction batteries for electric mobility (part 1)

Printed edition of SVĚTLO (Light) 5/2016 was released on September 19th 2016. Its digital version will be available immediately.

 

Standards, regulations and recommendations

Regulation No 10/2016 (Prague building code) from the view of building lighting technology

 

Lighting installations

PROLICHT CZECH – supplier of lighting for new SAP offices

Hold up the light to see in work your work

Modern and saving LED lifting of swimming pool hall

‘Sensing Skin’ Detects Cracks, Harmful Chemicals in Structures

11.10.2016 | NC State University | news.ncsu.edu

Researchers have developed a multi-layered “sensing skin” to detect corrosive or otherwise harmful substances in structures. The skin can also detect cracks and other structural flaws that are invisible to the naked eye.

The sensing skin consists of three layers, which can be painted onto the surface of a structure or pre-assembled and attached to the surface like wallpaper. The first layer is electrically conductive and is used solely to detect cracks. The second layer serves as a buffer between the first and third layers. The third layer detects cracks, but is also engineered to detect specific chemicals of interest.

Special sensing skin to detect chemicals

This third layer incorporates metal nanoparticles whose conductivity changes in the presence of specific ions. By changing the composition of the metal nanoparticles, this layer can be engineered to respond to any particular chemical.

If users want to monitor for chemicals coming out of a structure – such as leakage of the chemicals out of a containment structure – the third layer would face inward, touching the structure’s surface. To monitor external chemicals, the third layer would face outward.

Read more at NC State University

Image Credit: Julie Williams Dixon

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