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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2019 was released on December 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2020.

Topic: Measurement engineering and measuring instruments

Main Article
Innovative process in partial discharge of AC and DC voltage diagnosis

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2019 was released on December 9th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 9th 2020.

Professional organizations activities
Light technology konference of Visegrád countries LUMEN V4 2020 – 1st announcement
23rd International conference SVĚTLO – LIGHT 2019
56th Conference of Society for development public lighting in Plzeň
What is new in CIE

Interiors lighting
Halla illuminated new Booking.com offices in Prague centre

Helping machines perceive some laws of physics

04.12.2019 | MIT | www.mit.edu

Humans have an early understanding of the laws of physical reality. Infants, for instance, hold expectations for how objects should move and interact with each other, and will show surprise when they do something unexpected, such as disappearing in a sleight-of-hand magic trick.

Now MIT researchers have designed a model that demonstrates an understanding of some basic “intuitive physics” about how objects should behave. The model could be used to help build smarter artificial intelligence and, in turn, provide information to help scientists understand infant cognition.

Intuitive physics

The model, called ADEPT, observes objects moving around a scene and makes predictions about how the objects should behave, based on their underlying physics. While tracking the objects, the model outputs a signal at each video frame that correlates to a level of “surprise” — the bigger the signal, the greater the surprise. If an object ever dramatically mismatches the model’s predictions — by, say, vanishing or teleporting across a scene — its surprise levels will spike.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: Christine Daniloff

-jk-