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Current issue

ELEKTRO 5/2019 was released on May 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available imediately.

Topic: Lightning and overvoltage protection; Fire and safety technologies

Main Article
Verification of material coefficient defined in the standard STN EN 62305-3
Smart Cities (final part 10)

SVĚTLO (Light) 2/2019 was released on March 15th 2019. Its digital version will be available immediately.

Architectural and scenic lighting
The architectural lighting of Bečov nad Teplou castle
Lighting design in a nutshell – Part 41
The analyse of light picture a little more theoretic

Day light
Biggest mistakes in day lighting design of buildings

Cotton-based hybrid biofuel cell could power implantable medical devices

16.11.2018 | Phys.org | www.phys.org

A glucose-powered biofuel cell that uses electrodes made from cotton fiber could someday help power implantable medical devices such as pacemakers and sensors. The new fuel cell, which provides twice as much power as conventional biofuel cells, could be paired with batteries or supercapacitors to provide a hybrid power source for the medical devices.

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Korea University used gold nanoparticles assembled on the cotton to create high-conductivity electrodes that helped improve the fuel cell's efficiency. That allowed them to address one of the major challenges limiting the performance of biofuel cells—connecting the enzyme used to oxidize glucose with an electrode.

Biofuell cell

A layer-by-layer assembly technique used to fabricate the gold electrodes—which provide both the electrocatalytic cathode and the conductive substrate for the anode—helped boost the power capacity to as much as 3.7 milliwatts per square centimeter. Results of the research were reported October 26 in the journal Nature Communications.

Read more at Phys.org

Image Credit: Georgia Tech/Korea University

-jk-