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Current issue

ELEKTRO 12/2019 was released on December 4th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 4th 2020.

Topic: Measurement engineering and measuring instruments

Main Article
Innovative process in partial discharge of AC and DC voltage diagnosis

SVĚTLO (Light) 6/2019 was released on December 9th 2019. Its digital version will be available on January 9th 2020.

Professional organizations activities
Light technology konference of Visegrád countries LUMEN V4 2020 – 1st announcement
23rd International conference SVĚTLO – LIGHT 2019
56th Conference of Society for development public lighting in Plzeň
What is new in CIE

Interiors lighting
Halla illuminated new Booking.com offices in Prague centre

Algorithm tells robots where nearby humans are headed

12.06.2019 | MIT | www.mit.edu

In 2018, researchers at MIT and the auto manufacturer BMW were testing ways in which humans and robots might work in close proximity to assemble car parts. In a replica of a factory floor setting, the team rigged up a robot on rails, designed to deliver parts between work stations. Meanwhile, human workers crossed its path every so often to work at nearby stations.

 

The robot was programmed to stop momentarily if a person passed by. But the researchers noticed that the robot would often freeze in place, overly cautious, long before a person had crossed its path. If this took place in a real manufacturing setting, such unnecessary pauses could accumulate into significant inefficiencies.

Algorithm for robot movement

Now, members of that same MIT team have come up with a solution: an algorithm that accurately aligns partial trajectories in real-time, allowing motion predictors to accurately anticipate the timing of a person’s motion. When they applied the new algorithm to the BMW factory floor experiments, they found that, instead of freezing in place, the robot simply rolled on and was safely out of the way by the time the person walked by again.

Read more at MIT

Image Credit: MIT

-jk-